2018 Year in Review

Here’s a quick summary of 2018, which was an amazing year in many ways.

Great People

Before I get into the numbers I want to say “thank you” to everyone I interacted with: my KR Training assistants, course and conference hosts, students in classes, blog readers, podcasters and broadcasters, bandmates, venue owners that booked me to perform, audiences, and of course, friends, family and (most importantly!) my wife Penny who has been incredibly supportive of all the different projects and activities I dived into in the last 12 months. The people are what made it all so much fun.

KR Training

2018 was a huge year for KR Training. Between group classes and private lessons taught at the A-Zone, classes on the road and running training at national conferences, I taught more than 1000 people, spending more than 140 days on a podium or on a shooting range. I presented at 3 national conferences (Rangemaster conferences in March (Arkansas) and July (Oregon), and the A Girl and a Gun conference in April), and taught road classes as far away as Virginia and as close as San Antonio, Conroe and Beaumont. Subscribers and page views of this blog increased, despite my sporadic pace in writing articles for it. This year’s improvements the A-Zone facility included purchase of many more mobile walls and props for the shoothouse bay and additional carpeting for the main bay firing line area. During the summer, I also ran 8 USPSA matches under the banner of the Chicken Ranch USPSA club, and officially took over full ownership of that club’s identity as the club founders chose to discontinue running matches at the La Grange location. I also hosted a special event sponsored by CoolFire and Walther where participants got to evaluate and handle Walther pistols and CoolFire kits.

Historical Handgun Project

Work continues on the Historical Handgun project, with the highlight being the invitation to be on an episode of the Outdoor Channel’s Shooting Gallery show. I traveled to Colorado in September 2018 for the session, and the episode is scheduled to air January 28th. I read dozens of books, wrote reviews of some of them for this blog, have a dozen reviews in the queue to be written, presented the material at conferences, and taught the range portion of the course a few times. During my Virginia training trip, I spent a day at the NRA Museum doing research on books and guns, and later in 2018 I was able to correspond with several experts on the FBI shooting program, the history of fast draw competitions, and holster evolution. (Some of that content is also in the queue for future blog posts.)

Personal Firearms Training & Matches

I used to track my practice sessions and training goals in more detail than I do now. The main goal I’ve been working on for the past 5 years (or 30, depending on how you count), is to earn Grand Master rankings in USPSA. It took about 25 years to get the first one (in Production division), and since then I’ve chosen one division per spring-summer cycle to dig into, specifically focusing my practice on USPSA classifier stages. This is doing what those that are serious competitors call becoming a “paper” GM, in that I’ve basically retired from shooting major matches and just shoot club matches a few months each year. I do it because it gives me a short term goal and the excuse to get proficient with a variety of handguns. In the past few years I took on Carry Optics (slide mounted red dot), Limited and Limited 10 divisions (iron sights, single action style semiauto). This year’s project was supposed to be Single Stack division, going back to where I started running a steel framed single stack 1911 in .45 ACP. Despite my efforts I was not able to hit the scores I needed using a .45 ACP pistol shooting Major, or a 9mm 1911 shooting minor. But JP-sponsored Pistol Caliber Carbine (PCC) Grand Master Cory K, who won most of the matches we ran at the A-Zone this summer, kept handing me his PCC gun and saying “just the shoot the classifier stage with this….” and I ended up finishing up the summer earning a Grand Master rating in Pistol Caliber Carbine.

The other big accomplishment of my shooting year was a 4th place finish at the Northwest Rangemaster Tactical Conference, keeping my streak of strong finishes in the shooting match part of those events going for another year.

I also found time to attend about 130 hours of classes in 2018, including sessions at the Paul Martin Preparedness Conference, two Rangemaster Conferences, A Girl and a Gun conference, and sitting in on some classes I hosted. The biggest chunk of training, though, was completing the NRA’s Practical Pistol Coach certification course (24 hours), the Massad Ayoob Group’s Deadly Force Instructor course (50 hours), and the Texas Bar Association’s continuing education class (12 hours).

Musician

The other half of my bifurcated career is performing music: as a solo act, in duos and trios, and with multiple bands. In 2018 I played 142 gigs, mostly as a solo act on Tuesdays at Luigi’s and Fridays at Paolo’s, with a 4 night-a-week, 7 week run in November and December with Doc Tictok and the Mistletoe Medicine Show at Santa’s Wonderland, where we played multiple 5 hour shows to thousands of people during an amazing Christmas week.

I also performed with Midnight Express, Johnny D and the Genotones, the Brazos Valley All Star Band, Terry and the T-Birds and The Klone of Rock and Roll (Elvis tribute show), and was featured on a segment on local TV news in Bryan. I found time to record tracks for a new demo EP and the Doc Tictok band recorded our final week of shows to multitrack audio with multiple video cameras – so I have lots of material to edit down and release in 2019.

Personal

After Penny’s father passed away, her mother decided to move away from her home located adjacent to the A-Zone. We purchased “the Manheim house” (as we call it) in 2018 –  expanding the KR Training footprint a bit in Lee County.  I can now add “property manager” to my list of part-time jobs, as I handle maintenance and upkeep on our house in Bryan as well as everything in Manheim.

I got serious about weight loss in August, and stayed on a calorie limited keto diet until the last 2 weeks of December, dropping 30 pounds, getting down to 175 (before gaining a few pounds back with holiday eating). Still, between weight loss efforts in 2017 and 2018 I’m down a total of 50 pounds from where I was in 2016, back down to where I was in my early 30’s.

Penny and I took her mother for a week’s vacation in Washington DC in April, to see the cherry blossoms and museums. Penny and I made a quick vacation trip to central Colorado for our 20th wedding anniversary and my birthday, and I joined her in Vancouver for a few days’ vacation after she attended a scientific conference.

Summary

2018 was a memorable year, full of great experiences. In another post I’ll get into what’s already planned for 2019.

Active Shooter classes June and August 2018 AAR

These classes happened back in summer 2018, but with another session of the Active Shooter course scheduled for January 26-27, now is a good time to remind everyone of this course and what it covers.

Those wanting the full state certification can attend the full 2 day course.  Limited on time, funds or interest in the material? You can attend 1/2 or 1 day of the 2 day course at a reduced cost.

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Back in 2013, the Texas House of Representatives passed a bill that would authorize teachers at K-12 schools to carry on campuses, if they passed a special training course and met higher standards for proficiency. Under the Act, teachers would receive training on best practices for the protection of students, how to interact with first responders, tactics to deny an intruder entry into a classroom, and accuracy with a handgun under duress.  This enhanced training is voluntary and only available to teachers who already have a license to carry.

In 2017, the Texas Department of Public Safety began offering a 2 day course to certify License to Carry instructors in the new course.  Three KR Training instructors attended sessions of the certification class, and we held our first session of the new course on Dec 27-28, 2017. The course was developed by the Texas Department of Public Safety with input from the ALERRT program, to align it with material being taught to law enforcement officers nationwide. Both of the DPS trainers that taught the instructor course I attended were also ALERRT instructors.

This course content is general enough that it has value to anyone interested in active shooter response, and as a state-certified, state-developed course, the training it provides will be more legally defensible in court than other un-certified courses offered by private sector schools.

DPS guidelines require the course to be 15-20 hours long. It includes classroom lecture, video from actual incidents, roleplaying scenarios and range work.  In order to pass the course, students in it must pass the Texas License To Carry shooting test with score of 90% (225 points) or higher, the morning of the first day class.

We were told at the instructor course that we could add material to the course, as long as we did not extend the total class hours beyond the 20 hour maximum.  Prior to delivering the first KR Training version of this class, Paul, Tina and I prepared some supplemental material, to be used if time was available.   Some of that additional content included discussion of medical preparedness, hands-on training in tourniquet use, and audio from actual 911 calls.

Paul Martin, Tina Maldonado and I taught a session of this course back in Dec 2017. The AAR from that course is here.

I added two additional live fire qualification courses:  the shooting test from the NRA Defensive Pistol class, and the annual qualification course of fire used by a major Texas city’s police department.  My decision to add these optional qualifications was to provide graduates of the course additional documentation that they meet a national standard higher than the Texas License to Carry class (the NRA test), and a standard equivalent to what a typical responding police officer in our state has met.

Starting in 2019, I’ll be using the FBI’s qualification course of fire in place the NRA Defensive Pistol Test.

June 2018

The June course was taught at the A-Zone, with Paul Martin and Tina Maldonado assisting.  We began (as the state curriculum requires), with everyone shooting the Texas LTC qualification course of fire. Students must shoot 90% on this drill to pass the course.

Students also shot the “Shooting Under Duress” live fire block that’s part of the official curriculum. It’s shot at 3, 7 and 15 yards using photographic school shooter scenario targets.

Part of the state’s live fire drills include a few rounds fired at 50 yards. In the instructor course we were advised simply to let people attempt the shots so they could assess their current skill level. We chose to modify that curriculum to spend time teaching people how to actually get hits at those distances, from standing and prone positions.

We also included a “walkback” drill using an 18×24″ steel rectangle. The drill puts all the students in a line. The student at the front of the line engages the target, holsters and moves to the back of the line. Next student then draws and engages the target, holsters, and moves to the back. This causes the firing line to move back about 1 yard per student attempt. With 10 students in the relay, each cycle moves the firing line back 10 yards. We started at 15 yards and worked our way back to 85 yards on this drill, with many students still hitting the steel at that distance, including several using subcompact guns like the M&P Shield.

We also shot the NRA’s Defensive Pistol test, using the NRA D-1 target.

The course also included 10 hours of lectures and ‘red gun’ training teaching armed movement in structures. We added some additional red gun drills specifically addressing armed movement and decision making in a 3D environment with multiple people in motion around you. One student would be the armed defender, one was the active shooter. All students in the group would move within the training zone. When the whistle was blown, the armed defender would have to assess the situation in that instant. Could I shoot? Are there others at risk of being hit if my bullet goes through? If it misses? Where’s my nearest cover?

September 2018

The September course was taught at the Orange Gun Club, co-taught with Richard Worthey of RW Training.

Pictures of the class shooting the “Shooting Under Duress” module (above) and the metro PD qualification course of fire (below). Bottom picture shows part of the lecture portion of that course.

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Video from day 1 if active shooter class.

A post shared by KR Training (@krtraining) on

 

January 2018

The next session of the course will be held at the A-Zone January 26-27, 2018. I don’t plan to offer it again until June or July 2018, so anyone interested should consider attending this winter session.

To register, visit the KR Training webpage.

KR Training December 2018 newsletter

Welcome to the KR Training December 2018 newsletter! 

Class dates for February are set and March classes are in development. Don’t miss the opportunity to sign up now for any classes on the schedule. As the days get longer and the weather warms up, classes will fill quickly. Check the schedule page on the KR Training website for the full list of upcoming classes.

If you aren’t already a subscriber to receive this newsletter each month, you can subscribe here or follow this blog. You can also follow KR Training on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or subscribe to this blog for more frequent posts and information.

DECEMBER SPECIALS

Must pay in full in advance to get the discounts.

PREPAREDNESS TRAINING JANUARY 5 & 6

Start your new year off right by attending one or both days of preparedness training with Paul Martin, the KR Training staff, and some special guests!

Saturday January 5 is the “everything except guns” day (Preparedness Seminar 1)- medical from Dr. Ben Weger, kubaton w/ Tracy Thronburg, fitness with John Daub, chainsaws with John Kochan, and multiple sessions from Paul on a variety of preparedness topics. $160

Sunday January 6 is the “nothing but guns” day  (Preparedness Seminar 2) – a mix of lecture, live fire and scenario training covering topics specific to preparedness, focusing on how the prepper can better assist the untrained/undertrained in their lives with gun selection, firearms skills and team tactics in an emergency.  Immersive Training Solutions will be bringing their full screen video simulator and everyone will get to run at least one scenario on that.  Paul and Karl will also run a “Get Home Bag” live fire/medical scenario that incorporates multiple skills and gear. $160

Sign up for both days, pay in full in advance and get the discounted price of $250.

HOCK HOCKHEIM JAN 19-20

We are hosting internationally known Texas-based trainer Hock Hockheim January 19-20.  The class will be a mix of training across multiple disciplines: unarmed, knife, stick, gun.  No prior martial arts training experience is necessary to attend.  The Hand, Hock, knife gun course is a bargain for 2 days at $199.

OTHER JANUARY CLASSES

Jan 12th is beginner day, with Basic Pistol 1 and Gun Cleaning and Maintenance. Take both for the discount price of $120.

Jan 13th is “my new year’s resolution was to get my carry permit” day, with Handgun Coaching in the morning and Texas License To Carry in the afternoon.  Take both for the discount price of $100.  We do not plan to offer the LTC course very often in 2019 so those wanting to take the course from Karl should take advantage of this opportunity.

Another option for completing the carry permit training is to take the classroom portion online. We recommend the Point Blank CHL online course. Those completing the online portion can attend the Handgun Coaching course on Jan 13, which ends with the LTC qualification course of fire. That course meets state requirements for the 2 hours of in-person range time training required for the “blended” LTC course.  We are also working to develop our own online LTC course.

ACTIVE SHOOTER

Another session of the state-certified Active Shooter/School Safety class is scheduled for Jan 26-27. This course is suitable for anyone interested in armed active shooter response. For this session we intend to bring Immersive Training Solutions out on day 2 so students can run the active shooter program on their full screen (indoor) video simulator.  $400 for the 2 day course. Teachers attend for half price ($200).  School administrators attend for free.

UPCOMING EVENTS AND CLASSES

All events at the A-Zone Range unless noted otherwise

BLOG-O-RAMA

You can also follow KR Training on Facebook or Twitter to see our favorite blog content from other authors as we post it. Here’s a list of what we’ve shared since the November newsletter:

NOTES FROM KR

Here’s a list of what’s new on the KR Training blog since the November newsletter:

2019 SCHEDULE

Registration is open for all classes on the KR Training schedule. Weekday private lessons are still available on a limited basis.

Thank you for sending your friends and family to train with us. Your referrals keep our classes full and help us continue to offer in-demand classes that specifically address the needs of responsible armed citizens. Remember, now you can train with even more purpose through the KR Training Defensive Pistol Skills Program. Start working to earn your coin now.

We look forward to training you!
Karl, Penny and the KR Training team

Stop practicing shooting – response

This excellent article was posted recently on the Street Standards blog.

It lists 25 things an armed person needs to be good at to be well prepared for armed self-defense.

  1. You have to be focused enough to avoid potentially bad places, events, etc.
  2. You have to have a gun with you.
  3. You have to be aware enough of your surroundings to notice that something isn’t right.
  4. You have to assess what’s not right to determine if it’s a threat.
  5. You have to – in real time – decide if it’s a deadly force threat.
  6. You have to act on the threat.  Most people freeze or don’t believe what’s actually happening.  You have to employ appropriate tactics such as moving, sheltering a loved one, etc.  Of course you have to be aware of your environment to make the best  choice here (see 1. above).
  7. You have to give appropriate instructions to anyone with you.
  8. You have to access your weapon in time.
  9. You have to employ effective challenging techniques, if appropriate.
  10. You have to track the BG’s movements in real time – we’re talking fractions of a second here – to understand what he’s really doing at that exact fraction of a second.
  11. You have to track what’s behind the BG so you don’t potentially hit an innocent.
  12. You have to be aware of anyone else in the area with a gun who might mistake you for a BG with a gun.
  13. If you have to shoot, you have to hit the BG, preferably COM.
  14. You have to track the just-shot BG to make sure his weapon is out of reach and prevent same weapon from falling into the hands of his buddies or a bystander.
  15. You have to communicate effectively with the now-shocked/hysterical bystanders to keep them safe, let them know what just happened, and make it clear that you – the guy that just shot someone – is in fact a good guy.
  16. You have to get yourself and loved ones to safety.
  17. You have to get your gun out of sight.
  18. You have to call 911 while making it clear that you are the good guy.  Included in  that call, among other things, has to be a description of you so that responding cops know who you are.  You want to do this yourself for what I hope are obvious reasons.  Also of course, you have to know everything else to say and what to include in this critical call.
  19. You have to initiate first aid to any innocent injured.
  20. You have to make sure you’re not shot by responding police.
  21. You have to know how to interact with responding police: how to act, what to say, what not to say, etc.
  22. You have to call your lawyer.  Do you know who’ll you’ll call?  Bail will come later.
  23. You have to call your spouse, partner, parents, whomever, if they aren’t with you to let them know you’re OK and won’t be home for dinner.  Or maybe for a few days.  And to let them know that the press will soon be pounding on their door.  And how to handle that, if you haven’t already discussed it.
  24. You have to call some trusted, competent third party to go and be with your spouse, partner, whomever to help them through this stressful time and to deal with the jackals in the press.
  25. You have to be able to articulate a clear self-defense case to your attorney.  This assumes that you know what those elements are, and what things (witnesses, etc.) need to be tracked down pronto because they will disappear in short order.

The author then points out that very few firearms courses address any of those items except #13.

There are a few national programs that cover more of the items on that list: Craig Douglas’ Managing Unknown Contacts class, Massad Ayoob’s MAG-20 classroom course being two of the best known.  KR Training is one of a handful of fixed-location schools that have offered force-on-force and scenario based training for decades, along with InSights Training, Tactical Defense Institute, Firearms Academy of Seattle, Modern Warrior, and other more recently established schools like Lone Star Medics and QSI Training. Other fixed facilities offer live fire scenario based classes using shoot houses, including Gunsite, Thunder Ranch, and the Alliance facility.

In the 1990s the National Tactical Invitational event included a full simulation “village” with multiple interactive roleplayers that covered the entire spectrum of those 25 elements in a way that no other training class or event open to the private sector ever had.  The logistics of running that type of event are significant and since NTI stopped doing it, no one else has attempted anything similar.

The reality of the firearms training “industry” is that the popularity of scenario based classes, particularly FOF, is tiny compared to the demand and appeal of high round count live fire classes. There’s a significant Dunning-Kruger element involved. (I discuss Dunning-Kruger and related topics in this section of my Beyond the One Percent series).  It’s easier to believe that you’ll always make the right decision under stress, and avoid opportunities to validate that hypothesis, than it is to risk having that confidence crushed by making a mistake in a scenario in a class. It’s no different than the D-K element that keeps 99% of gun owners/permit holders from going to any kind of training beyond state minimum. Going to a class with higher standards makes it impossible to insist that they “shoot good enough”. At least on the live fire side, poor shooting is something people know can be fixed with practice — and the infrastructure and tools to do that practice are well understood and available. Becoming better at all the non-shooting aspects of scenarios is harder to measure and harder to train for on your own. But it’s important, and you should seek that training out.  Reality is that the majority of negative outcomes that occur to gun owners are failures of actions prior to the shooting part of the incident, and/or mistakes made after the incident is over.  Even though proficiency is a frequently cited issue (or problem) in law enforcement shootings, draw speed or even precision of hits are almost never cited as the primary cause of a bad outcome in an armed citizen incident. This recent Growing Up Guns post is a great summary of information about training needs.

Some of those elements, particularly 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 15 can be incorporated into live fire training in mobile classes, and many trainers that offer traveling courses do include those elements.  They aren’t present in the standard type of practice most people do, which is standing in one spot shooting one target in a cramped lane at an indoor range, though. 

Those looking for training that incorporates more of those 25 elements should look at the trainers and courses I’ve listed above, or just compare the curriculum of any course they plan to take against it, as a good way to assess the value of the training.  Those topics are woven throughout many of the courses in our 40 hour Defensive Pistol Skills program (made of multiple short courses offered throughout the year) and the state-certified/state developed Active Shooter/School Safety program (particularly our version of it which expands the curriculum to include additional exercises beyond the state minimum). 







Labeling canvas gun cases

I have a lot of my pistols in canvas & fabric gun cases, particularly the LA Police Gear cases.  I use those cases to keep all the mags and misc. parts, and manuals together with the guns.  A lot of those guns are used as loaners when students need them for classes, and I’ve gone through several different attempts to find an easy way to label the cases so I can quickly find the gun I’m looking for in the safe.

Simple options like using painters tape, masking tape, duct tape or target tape didn’t work well. The tape didn’t stick and would come off when the cases rubbed against each other.  Using clear shipping tape to hold paper labels on had the same problem.

A complicated solution that worked was having paper labels laminated and then using velcro to stick them on. The advantage to that approach is the labels are easy to take off and can be changed or updated.  The UPS store where I get my mail can laminate documents for a small fee.


Velcro and laminated paper label

Even the velcro & laminate solution was not really what I was looking for.  I had tried some iron on labels before, but decided to try again with a different product.  This time I found something that works.



Ironing these on the cases using medium heat worked well.  (Take the gun and mags and etc out of the cases before ironing, of course.) I used the iron on labels on all the soft pistol cases in the safe, and I’m sure they’ll get a workout over the next few months as those cases get used in upcoming classes.

Shooting the Dallas PD qualification course of fire

Force Science recently published a study looking at performance by Dallas PD in 149 officer-involved shooting incidents.  Several trainers, including Tom Givens (Rangemaster), have commented on the data in the studyThe full link to the study is here.

One issue peripheral to the study is the qualification course of fire used by Dallas PD.  The course of fire is this:

Dallas PD Pistol Qualification Course
Round Count: 50
Target: TQ-15
Passing Score: 80% (200/250)

Stage I – 3 yards: From holster, draw and fire five rounds strong hand only in 10 seconds; transfer weapon to support hand and remain at low ready. When targets turn fire five rounds in 10 seconds, support hand only. (10 total rounds this stage)

Stage II – 7 yards: From holster, fire five rounds in 10 seconds; targets turn away; remain at low ready. When targets turn, fire five rounds in 10 seconds and return to low ready. Targets turn again and again, fire five rounds in 10 seconds. (15 total rounds this stage)

Stage IIa – 7 yards: Set up pistol with five total rounds on board and two five round magazines in pouch. When targets face, draw and fire five rounds; slide lock reload; fire five more rounds, execute a second slide locked reload and then fire five more rounds in 30 seconds total. (15 total rounds in this stage)

Stage III – 15 yards: Draw and fire five rounds in 15 seconds. (5 total rounds this stage)

Stage IV – 25 yards: Shooter starts one step right and one step behind barricade. When targets face, move to cover, draw and fire five rounds in 30 seconds. (5 total rounds this stage)



How hard is the course of fire?

I had some TQ-15 targets and put one up to run the course of fire. When I started looking at the times, I compared them to par times for the Texas License To Carry test.  Similar to Texas LTC, it has 5 shots in 10 seconds at 3 and 7 yards, and 5 shots in 15 seconds from the 15 yard line, with the only difference being that many strings start from the holster rather than a ready position.

As I discussed recently in a post suggesting a modified version of the LTC course of fire, the time limits and standards for the Texas LTC test are so easy that the test is nearly impossible to fail, even for someone with absolutely no prior firearms experience.  The LTC test standards are NOT the answer to the question “what level of proficiency is desired to have acceptable performance in a gunfight?“.  They are the answer to the question “what are the lowest possible standards that can be used to assess whether someone is a danger to themselves or others if armed in public?

I didn’t bother to shoot the test using the original par times.  Instead, I borrowed a idea from Massad Ayoob, who scales the difficulty of his MAG-20 shooting test in higher level classes by dividing the par times by 2, 3 and 4 to increase the drill difficulty. 

Shooting the Double Speed Dallas PD Qual

The double speed Dallas PD qual is this:

Phase 1 – 3 yards
(5 seconds) – Draw and fire 5 shots strong hand only, transfer to support hand and stay at ready
(5 seconds) – Fire 5 shots support hand only, reload and holster

Phase 2 – 7 yards
(5 seconds) – Draw and fire 5 shots, go to low ready
(5 seconds) – Fire 5 shots, go to low ready
(5 seconds) – Fire 5 shots, go to low ready

Phase 2a – 7 yards
Load with 4+1 in gun, two additional 5 round mags on belt
(15 seconds) – Draw, 5, reload, 5, reload, 5

Phase 3 – 15 yards
(7.5 seconds) – Draw and fire 5 rounds

Phase 4 – 25 yards
(15 seconds) – Draw, move one step to cover, fire 5 rounds

Here’s my target. 250/250.



Shooting the Quadruple Speed Dallas PD test


Just to see how hard the test was at quadruple speed, I ran it again using the same target. I didn’t tape up the previous run, because I was lazy and it was cold.  My assumption was that I could easily see any hits outside the center zone, and that I was unlikely to miss the target completely.


Phase 1 – 3 yards
(2.5 seconds) – Draw and fire 5 shots strong hand only, transfer to support hand and stay at ready.  This requires a 1.5 second draw and 0.3 splits.
(2.5 seconds) – Fire 5 shots support hand only, reload and holster. This requires about 1 sec to first shot from ready and 0.4 splits.


Phase 2 – 7 yards
(2.5 seconds) – Draw and fire 5 shots, go to low ready. 
(2.5 seconds) – Fire 5 shots, go to low ready
(2.5 seconds) – Fire 5 shots, go to low ready
For all strings about a 1.5 sec draw and 0.3 splits.


Phase 2a – 7 yards
Load with 4+1 in gun, two additional 5 round mags on belt
(7.5 seconds) – Draw, 5, reload, 5, reload, 5
Assumes 1.5 sec draw, 1.5 sec reload and 0.3 splits.


Phase 3 – 15 yards
(3.75 seconds) – Draw and fire 5 rounds
1.75 second draw, 0.5 splits.


Phase 4 – 25 yards
(7.5 seconds) – Draw, move one step to cover, fire 5 rounds

2.5 sec draw and move, 1 sec splits.  I shot too fast on this string and finished it in under 5 seconds. 

Here’s my target.  248/250 with some points dropped at 25 yards.


Analysis

Even at quadruple speed, shooting 80% (200 points) on the course of fire should be do-able by anyone capable of passing the FBI agent qualification test, or any B class USPSA shooter or IDPA Expert level shooter. Anyone choosing to use this drill in practice should start with the “double speed” version of this test as a minimum proficiency goal, in my opinion.  Using an IDPA/USPSA target instead of a TQ-15 will increase the difficulty, as would trimming the par times to triple or quadruple speed.




KR Training November 2018 newsletter

Welcome to the KR Training November 2018 newsletter!  Class dates for January and February are set, along with guest instructor visits and Karl’s road classes.

Check the schedule page on the KR Training website for the full list of upcoming classes.

If you aren’t already a subscriber to receive this newsletter each month, you can subscribe here or follow this blog. You can also follow KR Training on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, or subscribe to this blog for more frequent posts and information.

DECEMBER SPECIALS

Must pay in full in advance to get the discounts.

PREPAREDNESS TRAINING JANUARY 5 & 6

Start your new year off right by attending one or both days of preparedness training with Paul Martin, the KR Training staff, and some special guests!

Saturday January 5 is the “everything except guns” day (Preparedness Seminar 1)- medical from Dr. Ben Weger, kubaton w/ Tracy Thronburg, fitness with John Daub, chainsaws with John Kochan, and multiple sessions from Paul on a variety of preparedness topics. $160

Sunday January 6 is the “nothing but guns” day  (Preparedness Seminar 2) – a mix of lecture, live fire and scenario training covering topics specific to preparedness, focusing on how the prepper can better assist the untrained/undertrained in their lives with gun selection, firearms skills and team tactics in an emergency.  Immersive Training Solutions will be bringing their full screen video simulator and everyone will get to run at least one scenario on that.  Paul and Karl will also run a “Get Home Bag” live fire/medical scenario that incorporates multiple skills and gear. $160

Sign up for both days, pay in full in advance and get the discounted price of $250.

HOCK HOCKHEIM JAN 19-20

We are hosting internationally known Texas-based trainer Hock Hockheim January 19-20.  The class will be a mix of training across multiple disciplines: unarmed, knife, stick, gun.  No prior martial arts training experience is necessary to attend.  The Hand, Hock, knife gun course is a bargain for 2 days at $199.

OTHER JANUARY CLASSES

Jan 12th is beginner day, with Basic Pistol 1 and Gun Cleaning and Maintenance. Take both for the discount price of $120.

Jan 13th is “my new year’s resolution was to get my carry permit” day, with Handgun Coaching in the morning and Texas License To Carry in the afternoon.  Take both for the discount price of $100.  We do not plan to offer the LTC course very often in 2019 so those wanting to take the course from Karl should take advantage of this opportunity.

Another option for completing the carry permit training is to take the classroom portion online. We recommend the Point Blank CHL online course. Those completing the online portion can attend the Handgun Coaching course on Jan 13, which ends with the LTC qualification course of fire. That course meets state requirements for the 2 hours of in-person range time training required for the “blended” LTC course.  We are also working to develop our own online LTC course.

ACTIVE SHOOTER

Another session of the state-certified Active Shooter/School Safety class is scheduled for Jan 26-27. This course is suitable for anyone interested in armed active shooter response. For this session we intend to bring Immersive Training Solutions out on day 2 so students can run the active shooter program on their full screen (indoor) video simulator.  $400 for the 2 day course. Teachers attend for half price ($200).  School administrators attend for free.

UPCOMING EVENTS AND CLASSES

All events at the A-Zone Range unless noted otherwise

BLOG-O-RAMA

You can also follow KR Training on Facebook or Twitter to see our favorite blog content from other authors as we post it. Here’s a list of what we’ve shared since the October newsletter:

2019 SCHEDULE

Registration is open for all classes on the KR Training schedule. Weekday private lessons are still available on a limited basis.

Thank you for sending your friends and family to train with us. Your referrals keep our classes full and help us continue to offer in-demand classes that specifically address the needs of responsible armed citizens. Remember, now you can train with even more purpose through the KR Training Defensive Pistol Skills Program. Start working to earn your coin now.

We look forward to training you!
Karl, Penny and the KR Training team

Book Review – The Low Light Fight (Michael Seeklander, 2016)

As part of the KR Training Historical Handgun project to increase awareness of the history & evolution of defensive handgun skills, I read and review important books on pistol shooting and related topics.

The Low Light Fight – Michael Seeklander (2016)

I’ve been a member of Mike Seeklander’s American Warrior Society for the past several years, and I’ve followed him as a competitor and a trainer long before that, during his time at the US Shooting Academy in Tulsa and, before that, when we shot many of the same major USPSA and Steel Challenge matches in the 1990’s.

Mike has written many excellent books on shooting skills, and this one (The Low Light Fight) is another great read / training manual.  Techniques for low light shooting continue to evolve, as flashlights, red dot sights and lasers continue to improve and be re-packaged in many different configurations for handheld and weapon mounted use.

The book is basically split into three parts.  The first third of the book has chapters on basics of shooting, tactics and combatives, low light principles, and gear selection.   These topics define the core building blocks on which specific skills are explained and applied.  The middle third of the book focuses on tactics: the 1-3 yard threat, building & room search, and engaging threats in low light.  The final third covers a topic of great value to the serious student: dry fire and live fire drills that can be used to develop and evaluate low light skills.  Most other books on low light shooting end with demonstration and explanation of tactics and skills.

Much of the material in Mike’s book aligns with the curriculum of the low light shooting class I teach each year for KR Training.  Graduates of my low light course would find this book valuable as a review of concepts taught in the course, and guidance for how to maintain those skills.

 

 

KR Training October 2018 newsletter

Welcome to the KR Training October 2018 newsletter!

Check the schedule page on the KR Training website for the full list of upcoming classes.

If you aren’t already a subscriber to receive this newsletter each month, you can subscribe here or follow this blog. You can also follow KR Training on Facebook or Twitter for more frequent posts and information.

NOVEMBER SPECIAL

Caleb Causey is coming to the A-Zone November 10th to teach his one day TacMedEDC course.  It’s a great one day class covering material that goes beyond the “Stop the Bleed” course or any online first aid course.  Just like shooting skills, medic skills deteriorate if you don’t practice them.

If you are a graduate of any Lone Star Medics course, you can attend this class for half price ($100).

VOTE

Election day is Tuesday, November 6th.  As you might expect, I’m in favor of my students voting for candidates that will vote to expand gun rights and who will vote against proposed gun bans and restrictions.  The days when both major parties ran candidates that were “B” rated (or higher) by the NRA appear to be over, and now most races (particularly at the state level) are between “A” and “F” rated candidates.   The NRA has a website where you can enter your zip code and it will show you the ratings for candidates in all the races you would be voting on.  (It doesn’t require you to provide contact information and using it will not cause you get unwanted junk mail or email.)

NEWS

September and October were incredibly busy months for the KR Training team, with full classes every weekend the weather allowed, multiple trips to other states to teach road courses, and a record number of weekday private lessons.

Due to an agreement with range neighbors, KR Training runs NO live fire classes on weekends during November and December (deer season).  During those months live fire training is only available in the weekday private lesson format & pricing.

We will resume our normal schedule of weekend courses in January 2019. We are still scheduling classes taught by visiting trainers, and confirming dates that the KR Training team will be teaching on the road.   In the November and December newsletters we will be announcing more classes added to the schedule for 2019.

We are still confirming speakers and finalizing plans for both days of the annual Preparedness events we run the first weekend of January each year.  Saturday’s event will include medical, chainsaw, fitness and other non-firearm topics. Sunday’s event will be firearms specific and cover some topics not covered in regular KR Training classes.

UPCOMING EVENTS AND CLASSES

All events at the A-Zone Range unless noted otherwise

KR TRAINING TEAM NEWS

In October, Karl taught two classes for FPF Training in northern Virginia – a one day Historical Handgun course and a one day Advanced Handgun (expanded AT-6) course. The final day of that trip was spent at NRA headquarters meeting with NRA Museum director Jim Supica doing research for Karl’s Historical Handgun book (in progress).  There will be a blog post (or two) about this trip on the KR Training blog in early November.

Assistant instructor Becky Dolgener attended and passed the Rangemaster Advanced Instructor course taught by Tom Givens.

Congratulations to assistant instructor Levi Nathan, who gets married in November.

Karl and John Daub have already enrolled in the just announced Rangemaster “Master” instructor course to be held November 2019 in Shawnee, OK.

KR Training Shooting Team member and USPSA Grand Master Cory K attended all 9 days of the USPSA Nationals, competing in multiple divisions.

NOTES FROM KR: RECENT BLOG POSTS

Don’t miss future blog posts! Visit our blog site to sign up, and they’ll come straight to your email.

BLOG-O-RAMA

The blog-o-rama section where we include links to all the articles I shared to the KR Training Facebook page is on hiatus this month but will return in the November newsletter.  Follow KR Training on Facebook or Instagram to see that content as we post it.

2018-2019 SCHEDULE

Registration is open for all classes on the KR Training schedule, including those already scheduled for 2019. In November and December we take a break from offering weekend live fire classes due to deer season, but weekday private lessons will be available on a limited basis.

Thank you for sending your friends and family to train with us. Your referrals keep our classes full and help us continue to offer in-demand classes that specifically address the needs of responsible armed citizens. Remember, now you can train with even more purpose through the KR Training Defensive Pistol Skills Program. Start working to earn your coin now.

We look forward to training you!
Karl, Penny and the KR Training team

Modified Texas LTC qualification

Flying back from teaching the Historical Handgun and Advanced Handgun classes in Virginia last weekend, I was thinking about how the Texas License to Carry course of fire could be modified to be a better standard, but still retaining most of the characteristics of the original drill.

The Texas License to Carry course of fire is here. The target was changed to the B-27 from the original Texas CHL target (shown in the pictures in the linked article) years ago. The change to the B-27 was a step in the wrong direction, as the original target modeled human anatomy better than the B-27 did.

Target and Scoring

My modified drill will use the IDPA target, which retains the characteristics of the original CHL target, with smaller (and more anatomically correct) scoring zones.

Scoring will also be done with IDPA “points down”, so simple addition/subtraction is all that’s needed to score it.  The drill is a total of 25 rounds (half of the original LTC 50 rounds). To score it, just count points down.  25 (down zero) is maximum score.  18 (70%) is passing, 20 is 80%, 23 is 90% which would be considered “instructor level”.

Misses and late shots are -5.

Unlike the Texas “License to Carry” test, this version of the drill actually tests drawing from concealment.

3 yards

The original test was:

  • From ready, two handed, one shot in 2 seconds (5x)
  • From ready, two handed, two shots in 3 seconds (5x)
  • From ready, two handed, five shots in 10 seconds (1x)

The modified test is:

  • From ready, ONE handed, one shot in 2 seconds (2x)
  • Gun holstered, dominant hand on gun, support hand on chest, TWO handed, one shot in the HEAD in 2 seconds (2x)
  • Hands at sides. On signal step left, draw and fire 2 shots in 3 seconds
  • Hands at sides. On signal, step right, draw and fire 2 shots in 3 seconds
  • Hands at sides. On signal, draw and shoot 2 head shots

7 yards

Original test:

  • From ready, five shots in 10 seconds
  • From ready, one shot in 3 seconds (5x)
  • From ready, two shots in 4 seconds
  • From ready, three shots in 6 seconds
  • From ready, five shots in 15 seconds

Modified test:

  • Hands at sides.  On signal, draw and fire 2 shots in 4 seconds
  • Hands at sides. On signal, draw and fire 3 shots in 6 seconds
  • Hands at sides.  On signal, draw and fire 5 shots in 10 seconds

View this post on Instagram

7 yard string modified Texas ltc test on idpa target

A post shared by KR Training (@krtraining) on

15 yards

Original test:

  • From ready, two shots in 6 seconds
  • From ready, three shots in 9 seconds
  • From ready, five shots in 15 seconds

Modified test:

  • Hands at sides. On signal, draw and fire 2 shots standing, 3 shots kneeling in 15 seconds

View this post on Instagram

15 yard string modified Texas chl test idpa target

A post shared by KR Training (@krtraining) on

Discussion

The modified LTC test is more difficult than the original Texas LTC test, but not as difficult as the KR Training 3 Seconds or Less Test, which we use as the standard in our Defensive Pistol Skills program.

My changes incorporated some elements of the 3 Seconds or Less Test for the 3 yard strings and some elements of the current FBI qualification for the 7 and 15 yard strings.

The videos and target shown in this blog were first take, with no warm up, no dry fire. I just put on my daily carry gear, walked outside, set up the camera and ran the drill.  Scored 23/25, with one head shot fired at 3 yards with a poor sight picture, and one shot at 15 yards going a little high out of the zero ring.

The drill can always be made more difficult by shortening the time limits or using a smaller target for those wanting a bigger challenge.  My purpose in developing this modified version of the drill is to give those that stopped their training with the carry permit course (about 99% of Texas permit holders never take any training beyond the state minimum) a course of fire that’s short and challenging enough it could be run multiple times during a 100 round practice that included drawing from concealment.  Those running the drill at ranges that don’t allow drawing should cut a full second off every string time (except for the strong hand only that starts from the ready position).