KR Training May 2020 Newsletter

COVID UPDATE

The page at this link is our official COVID status page. We are running classes at 50% of normal capacity per state and county guidelines. We’ve added a second safe area to the main range to allow better social distancing between students and we have modified some courses to reduce indoor classroom time. Summer USPSA matches are still on hold.

JUNE 20 CLASSES

We are offering a combo of classes suitable for all levels on June 20th. The “hot weather, low round count” version of Top 10 Drills will be 3 hours and 250 rounds (instead of 4 hours and 300 rounds). That class will be a great refresher/tune up for those that haven’t done any shooting for awhile.

That afternoon is all indoors, for a one hour Pepper Spray Essentials, and a session of our Personal Tactics Skills class. The PTS course is a required class in the Defensive Pistol Skills challenge coin program. Students in the Pepper Spray Essentials course will NOT be sprayed with live pepper spray during the course.

UPCOMING CLASSES WITH SPACE AVAILABLE

We have added some classes to our June-August schedule. Want something not listed? Need DPS-3 to earn your challenge coin? Contact us and request it. We still have open dates in July and August and want your input.

SPECIAL SUMMER CLASSES

In July, lawyer, former NRA-ILA researcher, military veteran, Federalist columnist, and firearms trainer Mark Overstreet will offer two indoor lecture courses. The Gun Rights Seminar will discuss the current state of the 2nd amendment in context of the upcoming election (state and federal), court cases, and other topics. The Tactics-Based Land Navigation course will teach navigation using “other than GPS” methods. In the fall we will offer the field exercise part of this class. (Defensive Pistol Skills 1 will be that morning. Taken DPS-1 before? Return for a half-price refresher and stick around for the afternoon indoor lecture class!)

Lone Star Medics returns in August for two 1-day courses. Cut and Stuff is a new combo class pairing Caleb Causey with knife expert Allen Elishewitz, teaching how to cause injuries with knives and how to treat those same injuries. Dynamic First Aid will be a session of Caleb’s general interest first aid course.

TRAINING OPTIONS

Karl will be available for weekday private lessons and small group instruction. Tina Maldonado and Sean Hoffman are available for weekday and weekend sessions in the NW Austin/Georgetown area, and Doug Greig is available in the Caldwell/Bryan/College Station and Conroe area. Training available is at any level, including LTC online completion. Contact us to schedule.


MAY BLOG POSTS

If you don’t subscribe to this blog or follow us on Facebook, you may have missed these articles we posted in May:


Tracy made two videos for the Guns 101 series from the Polite Society Podcast.


STRATEGIES AND STANDARDS BOOK UPDATE

A large format paperback version of John and Karl’s Strategies and Standards for Defensive Handgun Training book is now available. This version has larger print and easier to see graphics. We do not have signed print copies of the large format book available, but if you buy the book from amazon and bring it to class, we will be happy to sign it!


NOT SEEING KR TRAINING POSTS ON FACEBOOK?

We encourage everyone to follow the KR Training business page on Facebook, because that’s where we post interesting links and articles several times a week. If you are a Facebook user and you have not been seeing our posts, please remember to look at the KR Training page once in awhile. You can also follow my personal page, where I will start posting weekly reminders to people to go check the KR Training page. It appears that the Facebook “algorithm” is now hiding updated posts from businesses and only shows paid ads and updates on personal page.


Keep up with the interesting links we share in real time. Follow KR Training on Facebook or Twitter. Subscribe to this newsletter or follow this blog (right) for more frequent posts and information. Send me an email to schedule your private weekday training session.

We look forward to training you!
Karl, Penny and the KR Training team

A testimonial from Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training about Karl Rehn and John Daub's book, Strategies and Standards for Defensive Handgun Training.

Split the Difference drill

Recently trainer Bob Jewell sent me a new drill & target he developed, called the “Split the Difference” drill. It’s 11 rounds, shot from 3 or 5 yards on a variety of numbered dots.

print this on 8.5×11 paper

You shoot the dots in order, firing two shots on all the shaded dots (1, 3, 6, 7) and one shot on all the white dots (2, 4, 5). That requires a lot of zigzagging around the target to get to all the shapes in numerical order. It’s intended for guns that hold 11 or more rounds. Those trying this drill with a lower capacity gun can either reload or shoot fewer dots, with adjusted goal times. Add 2 seconds to the goal time if you have to reload. If you shoot fewer dots, lower the goal time by 0.5 second shot not fired.

He suggests a goal time of 6 seconds for 3 yards and 8 seconds for 5 yards, with a goal of having roughly 0.5 second splits and transitions. There is no time added for shots outside the circles. Your score doesn’t count unless all 11 shots are acceptable hits.

Here’s a video of me shooting it at 5 yards in 8.05. If you look at the target shown at the end of the video, it shows the hits from both my first run (with one miss on the “5” dot) and my second run. The second run is the one shown in the video. I had to slow down a little to shoot clean which put me just over the 8 second goal.

It’s a challenging drill. Dave Reichek (USPSA/IDPA Master class shooter) and I each shot the drill twice, and my last run was the only clean run out of the 4 tries, with each of the others having one shot just outside a circle.

Give this drill a try next time you go to the range. If the range won’t let you draw, start from ready. Try it at 3 yards first and keep working at it until you can shoot it clean. Then move back to 5 yards.For a lot of shooters, running this drill with no time limit just trying to shoot it clean may be the place to start. Then try a 10 or 12 second par and work down in time from there. The drill is short enough that it can be run 9 times with 2 boxes (100 rounds) of ammo.

About the drill’s designer: Bob Jewell has been carrying a concealed handgun for over 20 years. He is a Rangemaster and NRA Certified Instructor as well as a graduate of the Law of Self Defense Instructor Program. He annually participates in firearms, legal, medical, and personal defense training from top instructors and teaches advanced concealed carry classes.

365 SAS Sights

Earlier this week I taught a private lesson for a student that brought two guns: a SIG 365 with the SAS sights, and a SIG 320 with a red dot and properly co-witnessed backup iron sights.

SIG 365 and SIG 320

The SAS sights sit very low to the slide, and have a very short sight radius.

SIG365 SAS sights top view

The rear sight is a circle, with the “front sight” a dot, giving a sight picture looking like this:

SAS sight

Earlier this year I had one student bring a gun with the SAS sights to class, and that person had significant difficulty using them when pressured to shoot with any speed, or find the sights when bringing the gun to the eye-target line from a ready position quickly (as required in the Texas License to Carry course of fire). This private lesson student was a high skill level shooter, former law enforcement officer, who started out shooting the SAS sights fairly well when we started with the 5×5 drill from our Top 10 drills.

As we continued into the more difficult drills in the Top 10, moving back to 7, 10 and 15 yards, his performance with the SAS sights deteriorated quickly. We checked the gun’s zero by benchrest group shooting at 25 yards, and found that the SAS sights were hitting 8″ left, and his best group was 6″ wide. By comparison, he shot a 2″ group at 25 yards using his SIG 320 with red dot sight. The solution for the SAS sights would be to drift the entire SAS sight assembly over. After some dismal failures on drills at 7 and 10 yards, we opted to put the 365SAS away and switch to the 320 with red dot for the remaining drills of that lesson.

The SAS sights seem to appeal to people that aren’t skilled or knowledgeable about shooting or carrying. They think that regular sights, which are easier to see, will “print too much” or snag on clothing, or they plan on using the 365 as a pocket gun, with no expectation that they will ever need to hit a target at farther than 5 yards. It’s true that the majority of self defense incidents occur at close range, but even in those situations, the threat may be moving, obscured behind cover, or there may be a family member in between the shooter and the threat. So the ability to shoot with precision should be considered essential.

Similarly, those that aren’t skilled or experienced at shooting often fail to understand that sight radius – the distance between front and rear sight – affects a shooter’s ability to aim. The farther the sights are apart, the less small errors in sight alignment affect the alignment of the pistol with the target.

Most carry permit holders never shoot their guns from benchrest at 25 yards to check their zero. Had the 365SAS my recent student brought belonged to one of those people, and they had needed to make a shot past 7 yards, the difficulty in using the sight, combined with the gun’s inadequate factory zero would have led to a “negative outcome” (to use Claude Werner’s phrase). Missed shots most likely, injury or death to the armed citizen possibly. My private lesson student had been carrying that gun as his daily carry pistol, having no idea that the point of impact at 25 yards was nearly off the target at that distance. Regardless of the gun and sights used, all carry guns need to be properly zeroed. (The best way to properly zero is from benchrest, not two handed standing, as shooting errors can cause the shooter to adjust to compensate for errors, not mechanical alignment.)

As part of the lesson I had the student shoot our Three Seconds or Less Test using both guns. He shot a barely-passing 14/20 using the 365 with SAS sights, from open carry, knowing that the gun shot to the left and attempting to correct for that on the precision shots at 7 yards, and a solid 19/20 using the SIG 320 with red dot sight and backup irons, from concealment.

That performance gap illustrates the difference in capability equipment provides, in the hands of a good shooter with skills far beyond the typical carry permit holder. In my opinion, the SAS sights, even when properly zeroed, are not a viable alternative to traditional sights, or a projection laser, or a red dot sight w backup irons, even on a pocket gun.

Vintage Force on Force video from 1998

Teaching no classes in April 2020 gave me some time to go through the 30 year archive of pictures and video we have recorded during classes and special events. Thanks to modern video restoration tools, I was able to clean up some fairly low resolution, low quality video of an October 1998 session of Advanced Training 2 (force on force scenarios).

I posted some excerpts of the video to Instagram. The youTube link includes all the salvageable content. Back in that era we were using .38 revolvers loaded with Code Eagle marking rounds, and safety gear that was a mix of paintball, hockey, baseball and military surplus items. The class was held at the Sanborn Shooters facility in Smithville (our home base for classes during that era), with mobile barricades and other items used to build very simple structures. Graduates of AT-2 will see the Fisher Price cash register in use in the convenience store scenarios. It’s one of our oldest, most durable and favorite scenario props.

KR Training April 2020 Newsletter

COVID UPDATE

The page at this link is our official COVID status page. Following state guidelines we will be operating at 25% capacity for the first 3 weeks of May. We have added more sessions of Basic Pistol 2 and Defensive Pistol Skills 1 to accommodate rescheduled students and will be making more changes to classes in the second half of May. Dynamic First Aid has been rescheduled to August 2. We are holding off on scheduling additional classes and the summer USPSA matches until end of May.

If you have friends, family or co-workers buying their first guns, encourage them to take one or both of these online courses:

These cover the classroom and lecture material in those classes, with the NRA course focusing on technical aspects of firearms and shooting fundamentals, and the LTC class teaching Texas law. Even those only choosing to be armed at home should understand Texas laws related to deadly force. Those completing the online courses can do the range part with us this summer or via private lessons.

TRAINING OPTIONS

Karl will be available for weekday private lessons and small group instruction. Tina Maldonado and Sean Hoffman are available for weekday and weekend sessions in the NW Austin/Georgetown area, and Doug Grieg is available in the Caldwell/Bryan/College Station area. Training available is at any level, including LTC online completion. Contact us to schedule.


APRIL BLOG POSTS

If you don’t subscribe to this blog or follow us on Facebook, you may have missed these articles we posted in April:


Karl was invited by the Polite Society podcast to make a “Guns 101” video on ammunition fundamentals. Tracy Thronburg’s video on gun fit will come out in early May.


Want to know what the fastest possible times are on the different strings of the Three Seconds or Less test? We had two national match winners shoot the test. Video of one of them is linked below. Data and discussion of both runs is in a blog post. Most of the strings can be shot by a Grand Master level shooter in 2 seconds or less, some quite a bit less.

STRATEGIES AND STANDARDS BOOK UPDATE

A large format paperback version of John and Karl’s Strategies and Standards for Defensive Handgun Training book will be available in May. This version will have larger print and easier to see graphics.


NOT SEEING KR TRAINING POSTS ON FACEBOOK?

We encourage everyone to follow the KR Training business page on Facebook, because that’s where we post interesting links and articles several times a week. If you are a Facebook user and you have not been seeing our posts, please remember to look at the KR Training page once in awhile. You can also follow my personal page, where I will start posting weekly reminders to people to go check the KR Training page. It appears that the Facebook “algorithm” is now hiding updated posts from businesses and only shows paid ads and updates on personal page.

Even if you don’t want to follow us on social media, browse the posts on this blog. We’ve posted more than just the gear survey in the past 60 days.


Keep up with the interesting links we share in real time. Follow KR Training on Facebook or Twitter. Subscribe to this newsletter or follow this blog (right) for more frequent posts and information. Send me an email to schedule your private weekday training session.

We look forward to training you!
Karl, Penny and the KR Training team

A testimonial from Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training about Karl Rehn and John Daub's book, Strategies and Standards for Defensive Handgun Training.

Three Seconds or a LOT less, Maximum Speed

When we were developing the “Three Seconds or Less” test, one of the concerns was making each of the strings of the test roughly equal in difficulty. We enlisted the help of a couple of very fast shooters, K. Clark (multi-time winner of the Rangemaster Tactical Conference shooting match), and national champion Ben Stoeger, to shoot each string of the test so we could set the upper boundary of speed for each string. We captured video of Clark’s runs, compiled together in this video. (The video was originally shot in Feb 2018, and it sat on my hard drive until the COVID-caused shutdown gave me free time to dive into the archives and catch up on some stalled projects.)

Analysis & Discussion

Clark shot the drill using a Glock 34 drawn from a concealed appendix carry holster. Stoeger shot the drill using his normal USPSA Production competition gear.

One aspect of this test that is different from many standard tests is that some strings start from a ready position, and others start at “position 1” of the draw, after the cover garment has been cleared. This was done to avoid over-weighting the skill of clearing the cover garment.

String 1: 3 yards, step left, draw and fire 3 shots. Clark’s time: 1.29, Stoeger’s time: 1.21. Assuming these are “120%” times a GM standard would be around 1.50 seconds, with 3.00 seconds at 50%. So far, so good.

String 2: 3 yards, ready position, one head shot. Clark’s time: 0.76. When Stoeger ran it we changed the drill to two head shots from ready. His time was 1.06. In the end, we changed the start position to position 1 of the draw, to add a little more work to be done and balance this string against the others.

String 3: 3 yards, step right, draw and fire 3 shots. Clark’s time: 1.52, Stoeger’s time: 1.32. Similar to string #1 although both slowed down stepping right. Clark also shot a miss on his first shot on this string.

String 4: 2 yards, two rounds as you retreat. Clark’s time: 1.05, Stoeger’s time: 0.97. Were we to make more changes in the test, modifying the start position to “hands at sides” might raise the difficulty level of this string.

String 5: 7 yards, gun at slide lock, load, rack, shoot. Clark’s time: 1.51. Stoeger’s time, 1.10. My observation of students shooting the test over the past few years is that quick reloads and quick malfunction clearing skills often lag behind draw speed. In a typical class this is where we begin to have students fail to make the par time and/or start dropping points.

String 6: 7 yards, ready position, one head shot. Clark’s time: 0.86, Stoeger’s time, 1.04. We changed this string to include two head shots in the final version of the test.

String 7: 7 yards, facing left, position 1 of the draw (hand on gun), turn, draw shoot 3. Clark’s time: 2.07, Stoeger’s time: 1.31 Turning draws are common in USPSA matches, but much less common in defensive pistol classes. This string might benefit from a change reducing the round count to 2 shots instead of 3, although we have plenty of students in DPS-2 and DPS-3 that are able to get all 3 hits on this string.

String 8: 7 yards, facing target, position 1 of the draw. Draw and fire 2, strong hand only. Clark’s time: 1.86. Stoeger’s time: 1.57. Changing this start position to “ready” from holstered might provide more balance in the difficulty level of this string.

String 9: 7 yards, gun in support (non dominant) hand, aimed at target. 2 shots. Clark’s time: 1.64. Stoeger’s time: 1.35 Speed is usually not the challenge on this string for students; trigger manipulation is.

Clark shot 18 of 20 on the HCT-1A target; Stoeger shot 20/20.

K Clark’s target

While the HCT target design is good, we ended up designing our own target with additional features, to use for the final version of the test. The design of that target is discussed at length in our book Strategies and Standards for Defensive Pistol Training (download a sample chapter and/or order the book here)

KRT-2 on IDPA cardboard backer

Adding one additional string that simulates a malfunction is still something we may add to the test, or incorporate into an add-on test that has 10/15/25 yard shooting in it. We didn’t have Stoeger shoot the malfunction test but you can see Clark’s run on two versions of that drill in the video.

Many thanks to K Clark and Ben Stoeger for letting us use them as pacesetters. The scores we recorded were their first runs on the drill, and neither had seen the course of fire in advance.

1959 NRA Basic Pistol Instructor Manual

As discussed in a previous blog post, I recently purchased some vintage copies of the 1959 NRA basic pistol instructor and student books, and received permission from NRA to scan and share them freely. The 1959 student book download link is in this blog post.

The 1959 Basic Pistol instructor book can be downloaded here. The NRA owns the copyright to this NRA book. The content is over sixty years old, and should be used for historical purposes. The content does not reflect the NRA’s current position on any matter, and should be not be used in lieu of modern training materials.

1959 NRA Pistol Instructor book cover

The focus of the book is on instructing students in one handed bullseye shooting with .22 and .38 caliber guns.

Some training techniques recommended in this book would not be acceptable under modern safety standards.

Test questions 1

Perhaps the most interesting part of the book is the 3 page list of testing questions. Download the book to see the entire list.

1959 NRA Basic Pistol Student Book

While I was attending an NRA course at the National Protective Services Institute, NRA Training Counselor Ken Lewis showed me his copies of the 1959 NRA Basic Pistol student and instructor books. After class, I found some copies for sale on eBay and purchased some for myself, which I scanned into PDF form. I was able to get permission from the NRA to share them. The archiving is related to my ongoing work writing a book on the history of handgun training. (Other posts on that topic can be explored by looking at any of the Historical Handgun tagged posts on this blog.)

The 1959 Basic Pistol student book can be downloaded here. The NRA owns the copyright to this NRA book. The content is over sixty years old, and should be used for historical purposes. The content does not reflect the NRA’s current position on any matter, and should be not be used in lieu of modern training materials.

NRA 1959 Basic Pistol book cover

The focus of the book is on one handed bullseye shooting with .22 and .38 caliber guns.

Semiauto pistol drawing from NRA 1959 book

All the uses of the handgun shown in the book use the bullseye shooting technique.

1959 NRA pistol examples

Here’s the example of proper stance from the book. The skeletal line drawing approach to teaching stance was commonly used in shooting books into the 1970’s.

1959 NRA pistol shooting stance

This 1946 NRA film was one of the two films that instructors could show. The other one “Pistol Bullseyes”,

The 1959 NRA basic pistol book was 18 pages. The 2020 edition is over 200 pages, including significantly more information. The 1959 instructor manual was only 28 pages. I’ll post a scan of the instructor manual, with discussion of the contents, in a future blog post.

Shooting the Georgia state police qualification course of fire

Lee Weems of First Person Safety recently shared the current Georgia state police qualification course of fire, and sent me a few of the SQT A-1 targets to use. The course of fire was designed for both semiauto and revolver, so all mags are loaded to 6 rounds, and the reload times are quite generous. I’m a fan of lower round count courses of fire. In 30 rounds, this course covers a lot of skills. It is split into blocks at 25, 15, 7 and 3 yards. To shoot the course, you will need two targets and a barricade (two 55 gal drums, or even a vertical 4×4 post or the divider between lanes at an indoor range could be used – anything to give you something to shoot around.

Not only the timing, but the context and start positions for each string vary, incorporating moving to cover, stepping off line, ready and holstered starts, and other elements. Compared to many state and local courses of fire I’ve looked at, the Georgia course includes more realistic elements and context. The only elements it might need to make it more complete would be a tap-rack malfunction clearance and a few rounds fired one handed.

The SQT A-1 Target

As shown in the pictures, it’s an anatomically correct target with scoring zones in the right places and generally in the right sizes. I made some overlays, showing the 4″ and 8″ zero-down rings of the IDPA target, and the torso area of the KRT-2 target, to give you an idea of relative scale. I only had two SQT A-1’s and I wanted to keep one unshot, for my collection, so I used an IDPA target, a KRT-2 overlay and a magic marker to make a bootleg SQT A-1 to use as my 2nd target for my demo run of the course of fire.

General Instructions:

Firearm: Standard Service large caliber Semiautomatic Pistol/Revolver
Ammunition: 30 rounds
Target: SQT A-1 (two targets per shooter)
Clothing: Range attire & police service leather
General: Magazines may be loaded with 6 rounds each or as ordered
Equipment: Shooter will need a barricade for both the 25 and 15 yard strings.

All reloads are shooter’s responsibility. Malfunctions must be cleared and no alibis, with the exception of defective ammunition. The shooter will be given an opportunity to shoot defective rounds only. Any subsequent rounds are the responsibility of the shooter. Rounds may be made up at the stage where problems or malfunctions occur, but only within the allotted time limits for that stage. Leftover rounds at any stage are to be given to a line instructor.


Scoring targets:

Inside the center mass line – 10 points
Outside the center mass line – 8 points


Maximum Raw Score – 300 points
Minimum Qualifying Score – 240 points – 80%

25 yards (4 rounds)

Using the angular search technique, on command shooter assumes left side cover pointing weapon at right target. Avoid contact with the cover object.
1 round – 4 seconds right target & return to cover
1 round – 4 seconds left target & return to cover
Holster
25 yard line using the angular search technique, on command shooter assumes right side cover pointing weapon at left target.
1 round – 4 seconds left target & return to cover
1 round – 4 seconds right target & return to cover
Holster

15 yards (4 rounds)

Shooter stands outside cover facing targets weapon holstered & snapped in, (with a total of 2 rounds in the pistol or revolver.) On command shooter draws the weapon moves to cover & fires 4 rounds in 12 seconds
1 round – right target
1 round – left target
Drop to a kneeling position (RELOAD)
1 round – right target
1 round – left target
Holster

After viewing my video, Lee Weems commented: On “cover” the shooter draws and moves to cover. On “search” the shooter searches for and aims in on the target. The four seconds for the shot begins with the shooter aimed-in.

So when I shot the test I made it harder than the actual test. Based on Lee’s explanation, on “shooter ready” the shooter should be “searching” and sometime between standby and the beep, should be aimed at the target.

7 yards (14 rounds)

On command shooter draws and fires 4 rounds in 5 seconds
2 rounds – right target
2 rounds – left target

(Reload 2 Magazines 6 rounds)
Standing in front of the right target, on command shooter draws and fires 2 rounds right target, then moves one step left and fires 2 rounds right target in 6 seconds
Stand facing right target
2 rounds – right target
Step left
2 rounds – right target
Holster
Standing in front of the left target, on command shooter draws and fires 2 rounds left target, then moves one step right, reloads and fires 2 rounds left target in 12 seconds.
Stand facing left target
2 rounds – left target
Step right, reload
2 rounds – left target
Holster
On command shooter (from a low ready position) fires a failure drill, 2 rounds in 3 seconds into the cranial vault.
1 round – right target (Head shot)
1 round – left target (Head shot)
Holster

3 yards (8 rounds)

On command shooter draws while taking one step back and giving verbal commands, fires 2 rounds in 3 seconds.
1 round – right target
1 round – left target
Reload and holster
On command shooter draws while taking one step back and giving verbal commands, fires 4 rounds in 5 seconds.
2 round – right target
2 round – left target
Come to the High ready position, evaluating the targets
On command shooter will fire 2 rounds in two seconds.
1 round – right target
1 round – left target
Come to the low ready with an empty weapon. Once the weapon has been cleared by a line instructor, holster a safe and empty weapon.

After viewing this video, Lee points out: On the movement stages at the seven, on one string they are all in the right target. On the other string, they are all in the left target. It’s draw and shoot two right, step left, shoot two more right in six seconds. Then it’s draw and shoot two left, step right and reload, shoot two more left in 12 seconds.

In the video I shoot 2 rounds on each target, changing targets after I move. It ends up either being “two wrongs make a right”, as I end up with the correct number of rounds on each target at the end, or 40 points that don’t count, because I didn’t follow the directions exactly. To quote Lee: it’s a convoluted course of fire.

My score

I ended up with a 298/300, or 98%. I dropped two points at the 3 yard line because I attempted head shots, instead of body shots, for the very last string. If I re-shoot the test following all the directions correctly, I should be able to shoot a 300/300 on it.

My performance

If you watch the videos carefully you’ll see me ducking my head (moving my eye-target line) as I move and draw. This is something I wasn’t aware that I was doing, until I recorded myself on video and watched it. Fixing that problem is my #1 dryfire training goal. The “lesson learned” from this is that regardless of skill level it’s useful to record video (slow motion/high frame rate video if you have that capability) and study it to make sure you are doing what you think you are doing.

KR Training March 2020 Newsletter

Welcome to the KR Training March 2020 newsletter!

COVID UPDATE

The page at this link is our official COVID status page. We are scaling back to smaller classes, cancelling and rescheduling some classes in March and April. Tom Givens’ classes have been rescheduled to June. We will be doing additional cleaning of the facility before/after each class. We are holding off on scheduling additional June-August events until later this spring.

If you do not already have the ammo you need for upcoming classes, it may be very hard to find (both online and at retail stores). We are likely to offer some beginner pistol and long gun courses this summer so those that are buying their first firearm(s) can get trained on safe handling and operation.

If you have friends, family or co-workers buying their first guns, encourage them to take one or both of these online courses:

These cover the classroom and lecture material in those classes, with the NRA course focusing on technical aspects of firearms and shooting fundamentals, and the LTC class teaching Texas law. Even those only choosing to be armed at home should understand Texas laws related to deadly force. Those completing the online courses can do the range part with us this summer or as part of the Basic 2 class scheduled May 2.

CLASSES (with space available)


PAUL MARTIN PREPAREDNESS PROGRAM UPDATE

We have put nearly 7 hours of material (14 videos) from our 2018 Preparedness Conference online for download or streaming. These videos cover a wide variety of preparedness topics.

Paul Martin Preparedness Lectures from Karl Rehn on Vimeo.

Paul Martin is renovating his preparedness communication strategy.  Moving forward, he is putting his preparedness meetings and other preparedness training activities on hiatus. He has consolidated his online content to a single website (www.paultmartin.com) and his book Pivot Points.  A decision regarding the status of our annual January preparedness conference will be made this fall.

Finally, he won’t be posting news or preparedness info on Facebook moving forward. Anything in that genre will be placed on paultmartin.com.


STAFF GEAR SURVEY

Here are lists of the guns, holsters, belts, medical gear, pepper spray, and other items 15 instructors on the KR Training team use.


STRATEGIES AND STANDARDS BOOK UPDATE

John and Karl recently updated some of the material in their Strategies and Standards for Defensive Handgun Training book, including adding a new appendix discussing red dot sights. Those that bought the e-book automatically got the update. If you bought a print copy, you can download a PDF with the updated Top 10 Drills and red dot appendix by clicking this link.


NOT SEEING KR TRAINING POSTS ON FACEBOOK?

We encourage everyone to follow the KR Training business page on Facebook, because that’s where we post interesting links and articles several times a week. If you are a Facebook user and you have not been seeing our posts, please remember to look at the KR Training page once in awhile. You can also follow my personal page, where I will start posting weekly reminders to people to go check the KR Training page. It appears that the Facebook “algorithm” is now hiding updated posts from businesses and only shows paid ads and updates on personal page.

Even if you don’t want to follow us on social media, browse the posts on this blog. We’ve posted more than just the gear survey in the past 60 days.


PRE IGNITION PUSH SHOOTING TIP

We recently posted a slow motion video to our Instagram page showing pre-ignition push. That occurs when the shooter pulls the down gun just prior to the shot breaking. The shooter is typically not aware this is happening, because of blinking in anticipation of the shot firing.

The cure for pre-ignition push is a few minutes of dry fire each day, being careful to make sure the gun and sights don’t move as you press the trigger. Another way to cure it (or verify it’s not occurring) is to mix live and dummy rounds in your magazines when doing live fire practice.

KR Training now sells 8 round packages of 9mm dummy rounds, available for $10 at the A-Zone, or $15 shipped to you.

Click the “pay now” button below to order.


MUSIC

Here’s a playlist of videos recorded at recent performances, Dec 2019-March 2020, for those curious about the other half of my life as a performing musician. I look forward to returning to live performance when clubs and restaurants re-open. Here’s our trio version of the Rockin’ Pnuemonia and the Boogie Woogie Flu.

Keep up with the interesting links we share in real time. Follow KR Training on Facebook or Twitter. Subscribe to this newsletter or follow this blog (right) for more frequent posts and information. Send me an email to schedule your private weekday training session.

We look forward to training you!
Karl, Penny and the KR Training team

A testimonial from Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training about Karl Rehn and John Daub's book, Strategies and Standards for Defensive Handgun Training.